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ME3142   The Castle in Medieval Scotland (1100 - 1550)

Academic year(s): 2018-2019

Key information

SCOTCAT credits : 30

ECTS credits : 15

Level : SCQF Level 9

Semester: 1

Planned timetable: See http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/history/infoug/ugtimetable

Castles remain the most impressive physical reminders of Scotland's medieval past. The great royal fortresses of Edinburgh and Stirling provide symbols of Scotland's past nationhood; the ruined walls and towers of baronial castles demonstrate the power and pretensions of the great lords of the middle ages. As military strongholds, centres of government and lordship, and residences of royal and aristocratic households, these castles give access to the main themes of medieval Scottish politics and society. This module will study the castle in its context. The changing needs of military and domestic architecture in response to the needs of war and peace, the siting of castles and their use in wider structures of authority from Lothian and the marches to the Hebrides, and their role in warfare, as places of refuge and as bases for garrisons, will all be considered. Architectural and archaeological evidence will be combined with descriptions of the Scottish castle in chronicles and record sources to obtain a full understanding of the buildings and their functions.

Relationship to other modules

Pre-requisite(s): Before taking this module you must pass at least 60 credits from {ME1003, ME1006, ME2003, HI2001, MH2002} or pass at least 60 credits from {AN1002, AN2002, AN2003, CL2004}

Learning and teaching methods and delivery

Weekly contact: 1 x 2-hour seminar, plus 1 office hour.

Scheduled learning hours: 22

Guided independent study hours: 278

Assessment pattern

As used by St Andrews: 3-hour Written Examination = 60%, Coursework = 40%

As defined by QAA
Written examinations : 60%
Practical examinations : 0%
Coursework: 40%

Re-assessment: 4,000- to 5,000-word essay = 100%

Personnel

Module coordinator: Prof M H Brown
Module teaching staff: Professor M. Brown